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Hi folks,

It’s “back to school” time and no one is really sure what that means this year. Everything is up in the air. I hope you find this week’s newsletter grounding as you and your kiddos adjust to new and changing routines.

We are in the process of updating our fall parent support group topic and schedule. We aim to create session topics that will address the struggles parents of 2e kids are facing in these uncertain times. We hope you will join us!

As always, I hope you stay safe and healthy!
Sincerely,
Maratea Cantarella
TECA Executive Director
ARTICLES FROM AROUND THE WEB

A Mom Called 911 to Help Her 13-Year-Old With Autism, Utah Police Shot Him

Salt Lake City police are investigating after officers shot a 13-year-old boy with autism whose mother had called 911 for help.

Golda Barton told KUTV she called police because her son Linden Cameron, who has Asperger’s, was having a mental health episode. Barton, who had just returned to work for the first time in a year, told police her son had “bad separation anxiety” but was unarmed. Read more at USA Today.

ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

23 Productivity Apps for ADHD Brains


These productivity apps and tools were recommended by ADDitude readers in an August 2020 survey on surviving the pandemic with an ADHD brain. Add your favorites in the Comments section below! Read more at ADDitude.

EVENTS
HEALTH/MENTAL HEALTH

Signs a Child Might Be Suicidal

Some young people who are thinking about suicide let people close to them know that they are in pain and are open about needing help. Others hide their feelings from family and friends. If you are wondering if your child is suicidal, experts say that asking him is the best way to find out.

Parents sometimes worry that asking about suicide may make it more likely, but that actually isn’t the case, and asking is very important. For children who have a hard time admitting they need help, it sends the message that a parent cares very much about them, and that struggling and asking for help is okay. That conversation can be lifesaving. Read more at Child Mind Institute.

HIGHER EDUCATION

Navigating Online College as a Disabled Student

AS THE FALL SEMESTER begins and students head back to class, many are doing so virtually. Colleges are taking coronavirus prevention precautions, with hundreds opting for fully or partially online classes. Read more at US News & World Report.

IN THE (HOME) CLASSROOM

Computer Glitches Disrupt Classes as Schools Return Online


HOUSTON (AP) — Students across the U.S. ran into computer glitches Tuesday as they began the school year with online instruction at home because of the coronavirus, adding to the list of problems that have thrust many a harried parent into the role of teacher’s aide and tech support person. Read more at The Associated Press.

The New York Times is Available to HS Students and Teachers Across the US — Free

 

Free digital access continues through September 1, 2021.

The mission of The New York Times — to seek the truth and help people understand the world — is critically important in this moment of upheaval. And as students and teachers head into an unprecedented school year, it’s essential that they have access to information that helps them understand what’s happening.

That’s why The Times is working with Verizon to provide high school students and teachers with a free digital subscription through September 1, 2021 — helping them stay connected to the world, even as it continues to change. Read more at The New York Times.

INDEPENDENT LIVING

How One Company Is Providing Jobs For Those With Autism



Unemployment among those with autism is approximately 85 percent. This statistic means that roughly two-thirds of people with autism are not working. In general, those with autism had lower employment rates and higher rates of social isolation than people with other kinds of disabilities. These numbers are daunting for those with autism and the families and caretakers who love them. Read the full story at Forbes.

OPINION/PERSPECTIVE

I’ve Been Paralyzed Since I Was 3. Here’s Why Kindness Toward Disabled People Is More Complicated Than You Think


I am a magnet for kindness. Like the center of a black hole, my body attracts every good deed from across the universe to the foot of my wheelchair. I move through parking lots and malls, farmers’ markets and airports, bookstores and buffets, and people scramble to my aid.  Read more at Time.

PARENTING

An Open Letter To My Sons’ Future Partners

I tried. Please, know that I tried.

My goal in raising these two boys was to raise them to be successful orphans. Well, that was step one. Step two was to mold them into young men whose future partners wouldn’t want to smother them with pillows in the dead of night.

They can do their own laundry. I’ve made them do it for the last several years (including bedding!) and I can’t tell you what a relief it is to not have it on my to do list. They might be doing it in the middle of the night, when they wake in a cold sweat, remembering that they’re out of underwear and it’s crawl out from under the blankets at 2 am or go commando, but they do their own laundry! Putting away is a different story, and let’s not even go into ironing, m’kay? In their defense, I think ironing is of the devil myself, and only iron my concert blacks if they’re bad.

Read more at Laughing At Chaos.

RESEARCH

Low-dose Electrical Stimulation Helps Adults With Dyslexia, Study Finds

Electrical stimulation of the brain improves reading accuracy in adults with dyslexia, according to a study published Tuesday by PLOS Biology.

Transcranial alternating current stimulation, a non-invasive procedure that delivers low-dose electricity to the brain over a period of 20 minutes, was found to improve phonological processing — or ability to discern how words sound or are pronounced — and reading accuracy in 15 adults with dyslexia, the researchers said. Read more at United Press International.

2e ADULTS

How I Make Friends as an Autistic Person

I have always been blessed with friends not only as an autistic, but as a person. As someone who can’t read body language, who has a hard time learning social skills, and struggles to make eye contact, I shouldn’t be very good at making friends. Thanks to different people I have learned a lot, worked hard, and I make friends fairly easily. Here are some things that have helped me.

Read more at The Mighty.

Thanks for joining us again this week. We hope you enjoyed this edition of TECA Insights. Please let us know what you think.  If you come across an article or resource that you think our community would benefit from, please share it with us. We look forward to hearing from you!